Hip Arthroscopy Recovery Tips

How to Boost Your Recovery after Hip Arthroscopy

Having hip arthroscopy is scary when you do not know what to expect afterwards. Science has found that psychological stress is detrimental to the body’s healing process and can prolong your recuperation. Learning how to prepare for the typical recovery period before your scheduled surgery will help ease your mind and give you time to make arrangements for the necessary post-procedural support. These are all great questions to explore with Dr. Irvine before you have hip arthroscopy:

  • How long will you experience pain during your recovery? Recovery from joint surgery is different for each person. It is not unusual to experience pain and soreness for 3-6 months after the procedure. Talk with Dr. Irvine about pain control methods that will work best for you. Keeping on top of your pain levels reduces your psychological stress and aids in your healing process.
  • Will you need to use a walker, crutches, or a cane? Crutches are used for the first 2 weeks (possibly up to 6 weeks) after the procedure so that you are not placing weight on the affected side.
  • Will you need to stay at an inpatient rehabilitation facility afterwards? Typically this is not the case, however, inpatient rehabilitation may be required in rare instances and Dr. Irvine can address this with you.
  • When should you expect to start physical therapy? A post-operative appointment is scheduled about a week after the surgery to remove any stitches and check on your progress. During this visit Dr. Irvine will assess if you are ready to begin physical therapy, which often begins the following week.
  • How long does physical therapy usually last? The usual course of physical therapy is 2-6 weeks, though this varies from patient to patient.
  • Who will help you at home and transport you to your appointments? Enlist a friend or family member to stay with you for at least the first few days after the procedure. You will need assistance with activities of daily living, such as preparing food, toileting, and bathing. If you anticipate needing additional help, you may wish to arrange for visits from a home healthcare service.
  • When will you be able to start driving again? You may be able to drive as soon as a week after the surgery if Dr. Irvine clears you to drive at your initial post-operative appointment. Talk with Dr. Irvine to find out what criteria is used to determine when you will be ready to drive again.

At Missouri Orthopedics, we strive to help you achieve your mobility goals so you can get back to the activities you enjoy. Please contact us to find out how we can serve your physical rehabilitation and orthopedic needs in the Greater St. Louis area.

How Increasing Core Stability Helps in Injury Prevention

Did you know that the core consists of more than just your abdominal muscles? Actually, the core also includes your lower back, hips, and pelvis. Imagine your core as a trunk of a tree. A weak trunk leaves the tree vulnerable to cracks, breaks, and caving. The same is true for our core muscles; a weak core increases the risk of injury because the body’s foundation support is lacking.

How Does a Strong Core Help in Injury Prevention?

Healthshare.com has great information by various health professionals on the importance of core stability. Dr. Peter Dun states:

“For a range of injuries that can be classified as overuse or repetitive – such as types of neck/lower back pain, groin/hamstring/shoulder rotator cuff problems among others – it is important that assessment of the integrated stabilizing system of the body frame [the core] is included in overall injury management.”

Usain Bolt is a great example of an athlete with a strong core, which is a major contributor to his success as a runner.

“The body is a unit – a kinetic chain of links that work together to maximize speed. While certain links are more important than others (glutes and hammies), all of the body’s muscles must be powerful and coordinated for optimal performance. A strong core can help protect Usain’s spine by transferring forces more efficiently and sparing the lumbopelvic structures.” – Brett Contrenas, CSCS

What Are Some Ways to Strengthen Core Muscles?

Building and maintaining a strong core is pivotal for the body to work as a cohesive unit. Many “core” exercises consist solely of crunches and sit-ups; however, research shows that exercise professionals, and even the military, question these types of exercises because of lower back and spine injuries. Additionally, sit-ups and similar exercises only strengthen the outer layer of the abdominal, the rectus abdominis. If the deeper, internal muscles are overlooked, the core will still be weak. Instead, find exercises that strengthen the pelvic floor, transverse abdominis, and diaphragm. Pilates is a great place to start.

We are passionate about our clients! Contact us to find out how we can help relieve pain and assist in injury management.

Secrets To Maximizing Your Recovery And Rehabilitation Following Knee Surgery

Following arthroscopic knee surgery, you’ll be faced with the recovery and rehabilitation process. This time of healing can sometimes feel overwhelming. Fortunately we’ve got some ideas on how you can maximize your healing. Eight ways, to be precise.

  • Be patient: Arthroscopic knee surgery is the least invasive way to repair knee injury or disease, and Dr. Irvine is very good at it. But the recovery process – when your body is rebuilding tissues and strengthening connections – takes time. Be patient.
  • Be ready to start rehab immediately: With very few exceptions, you’ll be starting physical therapy within 24 hours of your surgery. In order to get your full range of motion back, you’ve got to move!
  • Communicate: Your doctor and others involved in your rehab need to know how your knee is feeling, what hurts and what doesn’t, and how well you’re following the rehab plan.
  • Expect a little pain: You’ve heard of “no pain, no gain” right? Recovery following knee surgery is no different. We think you’ll be surprised at how little pain you have, and will provide you with pain medication to help.
  • Don’t suffer: Having a little pain while you’re following the exercise plan outlined for you is normal. But if your pain feels unmanageable, speak up! Although pain can be a normal part of the healing process, when pain is extreme it can signal complications or infection.
  • Don’t push ahead of your rehab plan: Depending on your pre-surgery activity level and the condition or injury that made surgery necessary, you may think that pushing harder will make your healing progress faster. This is rarely accurate. Your rehab plan is carefully designed to maximize your healing without creating any additional injury.
  • Expect peaks and valleys: Your rehabilitation progress won’t be a straight line. Expect peaks and valleys as your body heals. This will help you manage a tough day or when you feel like you’re not seeing the progress you’d like.
  • Pay attention to your mental health: Moments of frustration and even depression are perfectly normal. Denny Hamlin, NASCAR racer, talked about this recently following a repeat knee surgery. “That’s the biggest hurdle mentally that we fight through all this is not being able to do some of these activities [golfing and running] that we use to…” during the rehab process.

Knowing what to expect, following your rehab plan, and communicating through the process will go a long way to maximizing your recovery and rehabilitation following knee surgery. Please contact us with any questions or concerns you have, and we’ll stay with you until you’re fully recovered.

Cardinals Like What They See in Oh, Hazelbaker

The St. Louis Cardinals, with a record of 16-16 as of May 9, aren’t off to the most torrid start they’ve ever seen, but newcomers Seung Hwan Oh and Jeremy Hazelbaker are giving them plenty of reasons to feel optimistic. In the first few weeks of the season, the pair have already made a splash in the St. Louis sports news scene. With starts like theirs, Cardinal fans and players alike are asking, “Who are these guys, and are they for real?”

Meet Mr. Oh

Seung Whan, pronounced sewn-whan, is a native of South Korea. His calm demeanor on the mound earned him the nickname “Stone Buddha.” He signed with the Cards in the offseason after playing the last two seasons in Japan, where he established himself as a force in the bullpen. In 2015, he broke his own Japanese Central League saves record with 41 and made the All-Star team.

Despite such prowess, nobody around Cardinal land knew what to expect of Oh as a rookie in Major League Baseball. Success playing abroad is one thing, but how would he fare in the Major Leagues facing unfamiliar hitters? The early results are in, judge for yourself:

  • 20 strikeouts in 16 and 1/3 innings
  • Team-leading 1.65 ERA
  • No home runs allowed
  • .158 opponent’s batting average

Looks like he has the Cardinals’ brass singing, “Oh say, can you stay?”

Meet Mr. Hazelbaker

At 28, Jeremy Hazelbaker has finally arrived in the Big Show. Drafted by the Red Sox in 2009, he spent the last seven seasons bouncing around the Minors. The Cards selected his contract from AAA Memphis just before the season began, and he’s not wasting any time in confirming that their decision was a good one.

Thus far, the center-fielder has clubbed six home runs, knocked in 14 and is hitting an eyebrow-raising .297, significantly better than his career .264 average in the Minors. On April 11 against the Brewers, Hazelbaker went 4-for-4, including a double and a triple.

“It’s an indescribable feeling,” he replied when asked how he feels after making it to the Majors. “It’s been a long journey, quite a journey. It’s finally paid off.”

Congratulations Seung Hwan Oh and Jeremy Hazelbaker. Here’s to your continued health and success!

At Missouri Orthopedics and Advanced Sports Medicine, your health and mobility is our priority. If you are suffering from an orthopedic or sports injury, don’t hesitate to contact us today.

Understanding Elbow Arthroscopy

The elbow joint consists of three bones: the humerus bone of the upper arm, and the ulna and radius bones of the forearm. The ulna and the humerus meet at the elbow and form a hinge, allowing the arm to straighten and bend. Life without this ability would be difficult, indeed.

Thanks to elbow arthroscopy, conditions inhibiting the normal use of the elbow can be treated, relieving pain and enabling one to freely use their elbow again.

What is elbow arthroscopy?

Missouri Orthopedic Care St. Louis, Advanced Sports Medicine

Arthroscopy is a procedure that allows surgeons to inspect, diagnose, and repair problems such as releasing scar tissue to improve range of motion, removing loose cartilage and bone fragments, repair lesions, among others.

Common procedures include:

  • Removing loose fragments in the joint
  • Repairing fractures
  • Treatment of tennis elbow (lateral epicondylitis)
  • Treatment of osteoarthritis (arthritis that causes wear and tear)
  • Treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (inflammatory arthritis)
  • Treatment of elbow stiffness often caused by fractures and other injuries

How is elbow arthroscopy performed?

Under general or regional anesthesia, a fiber-optic camera is inserted through a cut the width of a pencil in the elbow, magnifying and projecting the structures of the elbow on a television screen. This allows the surgeon to diagnose the condition. Several other small cuts allow insertion of additional instruments into the joint for treatment.

Recovery and rehabilitation.

Arthroscopy is usually an outpatient procedure; expect to return home with a bandage over your incisions, your arm possibly placed in a splint to keep it still and instructions to put ice on it and elevate it regularly for the next couple of days. You more than likely will be given instructions for certain exercises to perform to build strength and increase movement and may even need physical therapy to complete the rehabilitation process. While recovery from elbow arthroscopy is often faster than that of open surgery, expect it to take several weeks for your joint to completely recover.

For more information on elbow arthroscopy and how we can help, contact Missouri Orthopedics & Advanced Sports Medicine.