Total Joint Replacement

Having Total Joint Replacement

Total joint replacement is not a step that is ever taken lightly, but should you need this advanced surgical option, Missouri Orthopedics and Advanced Sports Medicine is committed to making this a winning experience from evaluation to recovery: Missouri Sports Medicine. Before deciding your joint’s condition warrants replacement, several less drastic forms of care may be tried. These can include physical therapy, injections, and arthroscopic surgery. If these ameliorative treatments don’t restore the joint’s normal function, an x-ray, and possibly an MRI, may be ordered to determine any joint and tissue damage.

The Decision for Surgery

Assuming that you are healthy enough for surgery, joint instability, pain that won’t allow you to sleep at night, the inability to perform the normal daily functions of life, and being prevented from doing the things you enjoy are all factors that may lead you to decide that total joint replacement is the best option. After you and your doctor decide that you will go ahead with the surgery, you will be thoroughly briefed on what to expect, and you will also be informed about the preparation that should take place in the home, so your recovery phase will run smoothly. In most cases you will be administered general anesthesia before the procedure begins. Using knee-joint replacement as an example, damaged parts of the joint will be removed in preparation for your new knee, and after the surfaces of the joint have been prepared, the new components of the knee will be anchored in place.

Post-Total Joint Surgery

After coming out of surgery, a great number of post-surgical tasks will be taking place. You will, of course, be having pain medication administered, but steps will also be undertaken to monitor the surgery site for infection. You may also receive blood thinners to prevent blood clots from forming, and as soon as possible, steps will be taken to maximize the joint’s flexibility. Your hospital stay may last from 3-5 days, and, in addition to post-operative care, light physical therapy will begin.

Recovery From Total Joint Surgery

By far, the greatest part of your recovery will take place during the 4 to 6 weeks following surgery. The physical therapy and follow-up doctor visits you keep will have you well on the way to a much-improved quality of life. If you need a consultation about possibly needing this procedure, please contact us.

How To Maximize Your Health & Performance

Recovery & Rehabilitation

Recovery and rehabilitation means something different to almost every patient. And medical professionals have a variety of different ways to evaluate both recovery and rehabilitation.

Rehabilitation: Not Just for Athletes

Returning to “peak performance” can mean returning to a full work week (without the need to rely on pain medications) or it can mean returning to independent living. Or, certainly, it can mean returning to the sports field (or track, or court) to be as competitive as ever.

Dr. David Irvine and the entire staff here at Missouri Orthopedics specialize is treating a wide variety of patients, with a wide variety of injuries and chronic conditions. We strive to understand each individual patient’s condition, extent of the injury, and set realistic – but optimistic – goals for recovery.

Activity Can Continue After Treatment, During Recovery and Rehabilitation

We have seen many patients who have put off orthopedic exams and treatments because they thought that once treatment (or surgery) was needed, it signaled the end of particular activities. But that’s simply not the case.

Advances in understanding human physiology, as well as advances in orthopedic treatment, mean that today’s procedures provide a means to a more active lifestyle – not the end of activity.

Anytime you have joint pain or limited movement, it affects your overall health. Our goal it to increase your joint strength and mobility, so you can return to your sport (or work, or previous level of activity, in any aspect of life) with better overall function and a reduced chance of further injury.

That’s the real goal of recovery and rehabilitation – can’t we all agree?

Don’t wait to take care of yourself. Contact us for an evaluation so we can help you get back to working, playing, and living life the way you want to.

Understanding Elbow Arthroscopy

The elbow joint consists of three bones: the humerus bone of the upper arm, and the ulna and radius bones of the forearm. The ulna and the humerus meet at the elbow and form a hinge, allowing the arm to straighten and bend. Life without this ability would be difficult, indeed.

Thanks to elbow arthroscopy, conditions inhibiting the normal use of the elbow can be treated, relieving pain and enabling one to freely use their elbow again.

What is elbow arthroscopy?

Missouri Orthopedic Care St. Louis, Advanced Sports Medicine

Arthroscopy is a procedure that allows surgeons to inspect, diagnose, and repair problems such as releasing scar tissue to improve range of motion, removing loose cartilage and bone fragments, repair lesions, among others.

Common procedures include:

  • Removing loose fragments in the joint
  • Repairing fractures
  • Treatment of tennis elbow (lateral epicondylitis)
  • Treatment of osteoarthritis (arthritis that causes wear and tear)
  • Treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (inflammatory arthritis)
  • Treatment of elbow stiffness often caused by fractures and other injuries

How is elbow arthroscopy performed?

Under general or regional anesthesia, a fiber-optic camera is inserted through a cut the width of a pencil in the elbow, magnifying and projecting the structures of the elbow on a television screen. This allows the surgeon to diagnose the condition. Several other small cuts allow insertion of additional instruments into the joint for treatment.

Recovery and rehabilitation.

Arthroscopy is usually an outpatient procedure; expect to return home with a bandage over your incisions, your arm possibly placed in a splint to keep it still and instructions to put ice on it and elevate it regularly for the next couple of days. You more than likely will be given instructions for certain exercises to perform to build strength and increase movement and may even need physical therapy to complete the rehabilitation process. While recovery from elbow arthroscopy is often faster than that of open surgery, expect it to take several weeks for your joint to completely recover.

For more information on elbow arthroscopy and how we can help, contact Missouri Orthopedics & Advanced Sports Medicine.

Hip Arthroscopy: A Minimally Invasive Option

HipArthoscopy

The hip-joint is one of the most amazing and important joints of the body. A ball and socket joint, it is one of the most flexible, providing a level of mobility that allows the femur to rotate freely through a 360-degree circle and is capable of supporting half of the body’s weight along with any other forces acting upon the body.

Estimable as it may be, like any other part of the body, the hip-joint is capable of suffering several painful conditions due to falls or repetitive use that is common in athletes. The normal wear and tear that comes with age plays its part as well and can lead to arthritis or tears of tendons and ligaments.

Non-surgical treatments that include rest, physical therapy and injections to reduce inflammation can help but some injuries and even diseases demand a more aggressive approach. Bone spurs around the socket; dysplasia and snapping hip syndrome are a few of the conditions that may fall into this category.

In cases like these, your doctor may recommend hip arthroscopy, a procedure where your surgeon inserts a small camera, called an arthroscope, into your hip-joint. The camera then displays pictures on a screen, allowing the doctor to use these images to guide miniature surgical instruments to the affected area.

Hip arthroscopy is generally performed under general anesthesia and on an outpatient basis.

Recovery will likely include crutches for a specified amount of time, as well as physical therapy to help restore strength and mobility.

For more information on how we can help, contact us

Most Common Youth Sport Injuries

Youth injuries are frightening to everyone for a variety of reasons. From a parent’s perspective, knowing that your child hurt is reason enough to pull them out of any sport for the rest of their lives. Your kids – and possibly their coach – worry that they may never be able to play again.

Thankfully, our body has strong muscles and bones that make us able to re-cooperate with a little rest; or with more extreme cases, some physical therapy. While allowing your child to play a sport has its potential risks, here are some very common injuries that can arise from intramural and team sports.

CommonYouthInjuries

Sprains & Strains

Many people can get the two of these injuries confused, but they are actually quite different. Sprains are ligament injuries that prevent excessive movement of the joints. Ankle sprains are quite common in sports like soccer, while wrist sprains can occur in football, basketball, and tennis

Strains can injure muscles or tendons. Due to the fact that we are dealing with bundles of cells that produce movement – muscles – and tissue that cushions the bones – tendons – most parts of the body are susceptible to injury.

Growth Plate Injury

The growth plate is an area in children and adolescents that holds developing tissue. When growth is complete, the tissue replaces solid bone. Long bones can include the hands and fingers, the forearms the legs, and the feet. These bone injuries are serious and should be consulted with an orthopedic surgeon.

Repetitive Motion Injuries

Hairline fractures and tendinitis are painful injuries related to stress. It’s important to know that these injuries may not always show up on hospital scans while they are still discomforting. Thankfully, a pack of ice and compression will relieve this pain quicker. In the most extreme cases, athletes need crutches, immobilization, and physical therapy.

Keeping kids active is extremely important to us. One thing to remember is that injuries should be reported as soon as they happen. Let us help you get back on the field as soon as possible. Contact us for more information on sports injuries and treatments today.