Secrets To Maximizing Your Recovery And Rehabilitation Following Knee Surgery

Following arthroscopic knee surgery, you’ll be faced with the recovery and rehabilitation process. This time of healing can sometimes feel overwhelming. Fortunately we’ve got some ideas on how you can maximize your healing. Eight ways, to be precise.

  • Be patient: Arthroscopic knee surgery is the least invasive way to repair knee injury or disease, and Dr. Irvine is very good at it. But the recovery process – when your body is rebuilding tissues and strengthening connections – takes time. Be patient.
  • Be ready to start rehab immediately: With very few exceptions, you’ll be starting physical therapy within 24 hours of your surgery. In order to get your full range of motion back, you’ve got to move!
  • Communicate: Your doctor and others involved in your rehab need to know how your knee is feeling, what hurts and what doesn’t, and how well you’re following the rehab plan.
  • Expect a little pain: You’ve heard of “no pain, no gain” right? Recovery following knee surgery is no different. We think you’ll be surprised at how little pain you have, and will provide you with pain medication to help.
  • Don’t suffer: Having a little pain while you’re following the exercise plan outlined for you is normal. But if your pain feels unmanageable, speak up! Although pain can be a normal part of the healing process, when pain is extreme it can signal complications or infection.
  • Don’t push ahead of your rehab plan: Depending on your pre-surgery activity level and the condition or injury that made surgery necessary, you may think that pushing harder will make your healing progress faster. This is rarely accurate. Your rehab plan is carefully designed to maximize your healing without creating any additional injury.
  • Expect peaks and valleys: Your rehabilitation progress won’t be a straight line. Expect peaks and valleys as your body heals. This will help you manage a tough day or when you feel like you’re not seeing the progress you’d like.
  • Pay attention to your mental health: Moments of frustration and even depression are perfectly normal. Denny Hamlin, NASCAR racer, talked about this recently following a repeat knee surgery. “That’s the biggest hurdle mentally that we fight through all this is not being able to do some of these activities [golfing and running] that we use to…” during the rehab process.

Knowing what to expect, following your rehab plan, and communicating through the process will go a long way to maximizing your recovery and rehabilitation following knee surgery. Please contact us with any questions or concerns you have, and we’ll stay with you until you’re fully recovered.

Knee Arthroscopy: Your First Step to Minimize Your Time on the Sidelines!

Your knee hurts. Maybe it’s been building slowly to this point, or maybe you know exactly when it happened. Maybe it’s a dull ache; maybe it’s a sharp pain that makes everyday activities unbearable. In any case, when you are tired of the pain impacting your performance, it is time to consult a professional like Dr. Irvine.

One of the most common methods of diagnosing knee pain is knee arthroscopy. With this procedure, several small incisions are made on and around your knee and a small high-resolution camera is used to view the joint. Arthroscopy can also help your doctor repair your knee, as the other incisions are used to insert small instruments to remove or repair damaged tissue.

The procedure can be performed under either local, regional or general anesthesia, and is commonly performed in a matter of hours as an outpatient procedure, so no overnight hospital stays are usually required.

While recovery time depends on a number of factors, typical recovery time from arthroscopic knee surgery is 4-6 weeks, which is generally much faster than the time required to recover from open knee surgery. Of course, your results will largely depend on your willingness and ability to be an active participant by following your doctor’s instructions for post-surgery care and adhering to your prescribed physical therapy regimen.

No procedure is guaranteed to alleviate knee pain, and it is important for your doctor to evaluate your symptoms and medical history before determining whether you are a candidate for knee arthroscopy.

For more information about knee arthroscopy, or to schedule an appointment, contact us to take the first step to getting off the sidelines and back into the game.

Common Hockey Injuries

Concussions, Back Injuries, Elbow Injuries

Hockey Players Take A Beating, Typically

It is no surprise that hockey player undergo some physical pushing and shoving during the game. Sometimes the game is so physical that it can lead to injuries to their body which requires the medical attention of a doctor. We recommend an advanced sports medicine doctor like our very own, Dr. Irvine.

Ice hockey players fighting during game, Dr. Irvine, Sport Medicine

What are some common hockey player injuries?

Concussion This is a traumatic brain injury which may alter the way your brain functions.

Shoulder Injury* Our team evaluates and treat shoulder injuries including labral tears, Bankart lesions, rotator cuff tears & more.

Elbow Injury* Dr Irvine helps east the pain from elbow injuries such as fractures.

Back Injury Hockey players are especially at risk for lower back injuries which can affect your skating stride and overall comfort.

Hip Injury* Dr Irvine is experienced in treating hip arthroscopy as well as performing total hip replacement.

Knee Injury* Our doctor can perform ACL and PCL reconstruction, whether it be minimally invasive or a total reconstruction. However, his experience does not stop there. He is also able to treat a number of other knee conditions and injuries.

Wrist Injury* If you are experiencing a mallet finger injury and/or a wrist or hand fracture, then Dr. Irvine is your guy to call.

* Denotes services in which Dr. Irvine can help diagnose & treat.

If you are interested in jumping onto the road of recovery, and would like to become a potential patient of ours, please call today to schedule your appointment 314-567-5850.

Osteoarthritis & Tylenol

Relieving Pain While Living With Osteoarthritis

Tylenol, also known as acetaminophen, is a pain relieving pill often taken for temporary moderate relief from osteoarthritis. However, note that Tylenol does not treat the inflammation that often times comes with this arthritis. It is important to consult with Dr. Irvine, or your general practitioner before taking Tylenol as some prescribed, and other over-the-counter medications contain acetaminophen. Consuming and digesting too much acetaminophen can be harmful to your overall health including your liver.

Osteoarthritis is one of the most common diagnoses of arthritis, and there is currently no cure; only ways to relieve temporary pain and discomfort. This becomes present when the cartilage found on your bones wear down; typically in aging bodies. This type of arthritis can cause pain & irritation in your knees, hips, hands and even your spine/back.

Woman grimacing in pain

Who is more likely to get osteoarthritis?

  • Older humans
  • Women
  • Being Overweight
  • Injuries over time, especially to the joints
  • Occupations that contain a lot of stress on a particular joint
  • Bone deformities
  • Diabetics, or other diseases like gout and rheumatoid arthritis

Do you think you have osteoarthritis?

common Symptoms to pay attention to:

  • Pain during, or after movement
  • Tenderness after applying light pressure to area
  • After inactivity, or waking up in the morning you may experience stiffness
  • Less flexible when trying to move in a normal range of motion
  • When using your joint, you may experience a grating noise or feeling
  • Little spurs around the bone

When to make an appointment with Dr. Irvine:

If you are experiencing any of the above symptoms for longer than two weeks and are growing concerned, then please give our St. Louis, MO office a call at 314-567-5850.

You may want to consider trying to answer the questions to come better prepared for your visit:

  1. When did your joint pain begin?
  2. How frequent is your pain?
  3. Do certain activities make your pain worse/better?
  4. Has this joint been injured before in the past?
  5. On a scale of 1-10, what level is your pain?

 

Hurt On The Job?

We help you stay on your feet

No matter how cautious your are, getting hurt while on the job is a possibility for anyone. Whether it’s due to lifting heavy loads, or continuously sitting at the desk, or the way you stand while working. A work relating injury can cost both you & your employer time and money.

At Missouri Orthopedic, Dr. Irvine specializes in treating common work place injuries such as knee pain, hip and/or shoulder pain and discomfort. No matter what pain or discomfort you are feeling, trust in our skilled and experienced care that we will get you back on the job and feeling well again.

Fluid, cartilage, ligaments & bone make up your knee joint(s). What helps your knee joint move is the muscle and tendons location within. If, and when any of the mentioned is hurt, strained or diseased (such as arthritis) you will have a knee pain, and knee problems that can cause difficulty walking or moving while on the job.

What is arthritis in your knee?

Cartilage gradually wears away in your knee, causing discomfort and swelling, and oftentimes pain while walking or even sitting.