Three Key Factors of Top-Notch Comprehensive Orthopedic Care

Three Key Factors of Top-Notch Comprehensive Orthopedic Care

Joints: We all have them, and as long as they are doing their job of keeping us mobile, most people don’t think too much about them. What happens, though, when you suffer an injury, or when a joint develops problems over time, limiting your mobility? Obtaining an evaluation and treatment from a qualified specialist is imperative to getting your body moving again so you can continue doing the activities you love. Searching for an orthopedic care provider can feel overwhelming, however, and when you are experiencing joint pain, the process can seem even more frustrating.

How do you know what to look for in a provider? What type of services are offered and how long will you need to be followed by the specialist? There are numerous factors to consider when choosing an orthopedic clinic, including what qualifications the provider has, what services are available, and which local hospital the doctor collaborates with should an emergency arise.

Here are three key factors to consider when choosing top-notch comprehensive orthopedic care for yourself or your loved one:

  • Board certified surgeon:Your health is your most valuable asset so you want to know that the provider you are entrusting to help your body heal is one of the best. When researching the orthopedic doctors in your area, inquire if they are board certified, indicating they have had extensive training in their specialty area of medicine and have passed a standardized national exam. Dr. Irvine is board certified in both Orthopedic Surgery and Sports Medicine.
  • Targeted services and procedures offered: Whether it’s bursitis preventing you from taking your daily walks, carpal tunnel syndrome impeding your efficiency at work, or a knee injury from last week’s football game, you want to receive comprehensive orthopedic care. Missouri Orthopedics provides care for both acute and chronic conditions, including those that originate in the shoulders, elbows, wrists, hands, hips, knees, feet, and ankles.
  • Hospital privileges and collaboration with other medical centers: If hospitalization or a rehabilitation facility is required as part of your treatment, you want to ensure that your orthopedic specialist is able to provide care in these facilities, either directly or through collaboration with their staff physicians. Dr. Irvine has a working relationship with five medical facilities in the St. Louis area, including the nationally-ranked Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis.

If you are currently searching for orthopedic care, look no further than Dr. Irvine and staff at Missouri Orthopedics & Advanced Sports Medicine. We strive to help you achieve your mobility goals so you can get back to the activities you enjoy. Please contact us to discover how we can serve your physical rehabilitation and orthopedic needs.

Staying Healthy While Recovering from and Injury

Staying Healthy While Recovering from and Injury

Part of a healthy lifestyle is getting fit, but if you are new to physical activity or it has been awhile, it can come with several challenges. One of the biggest setbacks that can happen in your fitness journey is an injury. Whether it is something serious requiring a lot of downtime or surgery, or something minor like a pulled muscle or minor sprain, sometimes the most frustrating part is being on the mend. Here are five steps to help you stay healthy while you recover from and injury:

1. Be patient with yourself. Any injury, whether it is a broken bone or a pulled muscle, is going to take time to heal. Some injuries might require more time to heal than others, which can lead to massive amounts of stress and frustration. While missing out on your usual activities may get you down, take this time now to focus on other aspects of your health. Just remember not to push yourself too hard in any new activities. You can actually make a minor injury worse or potentially cause a new injury.

2. Manage pain. Pain is an initial reaction to an injury, but quicker recovery happens when the pain is reduced. Proper use of anti-inflammatory painkillers and analgesics can help you work through an injury. However, caution should be taken not to overdo things, or you could be re-injuring yourself and not even know you have, so work with your doctor for a possible plan while using pain management medications. Keep in mind, improper or prolonged use of opioids could lead to a chemical dependency, so consult with your doctor about options.

2. Switch it up! If you are missing out on time running the trails, try some light lifting or even swimming to keep your cardio on point. The human body is extremely varied and oftentimes, focusing on a weakness might be just the thing you need to improve your overall health, so be flexible! According to WebMD, higher impact workouts can wreak havoc on the body, but the body’s need to maintain joint health and stay limber is consistent. If you evaluate how you got hurt, there is a good chance that neglecting proper stretching technique contributed to your injury. Work in some time to stretch and improve your stretching regimen. Injuries such as plantar fasciitis are primarily overcome by lighter activity and increased stretching. Give a workout like yoga a try to help increase your flexibility. As always, consult with your doctor before trying a new workout, particularly when attempting with an injury.

4. Ice and heat. Reducing inflammation and improving circulation are key in a quick recovery. Both of these improve the body’s ability to heal quickly, and you can help it along. Alternating ice and heat can facilitate this process, since ice tends to reduce inflammation as well as cause blood flow to retract from the extremities, and heat can help relax muscle tissue and improve comfort as well. Alternating hot and cold, in addition to chemical patches and creams to further stimulate these reactions, will trigger your body’s healing factor and can accelerate tissue repair.

5. Watch your caloric intake. Since you will be reducing your activity due to an injury, it is important to reduce your calories accordingly. You won’t need 5,000 calories a day if you aren’t maxing out on bench and dead-lifts. If you have downtime due to an ACL, you won’t be training for that marathon until the doctor clears you. So don’t comfort yourself with a pail of Rocky Road as you binge watch shows on TV. It will become easier to gain weight during the recovery period, and a heavier body will mean more strain in the short term and reduced performance on your cardio later on. Not to mention, you’ll have a more difficult time trying to bounce back into your desired activities once you receive the all-clear from the doctor.

If you are injured and need orthopedic care, or to learn more about safe activities during your recovery, contact us today.

The 4 Most Common Wrist Fractures

The 4 Most Common Wrist Fractures

The human wrist is one of the most complex body structures, consisting of a collection of ligaments, tendons, joints and bones. Unfortunately, its intricacy makes the wrist very prone to injuries, and it doesn’t require performing extreme sports to be at risk of a break. Even something as minor as a tiny wet spot on the floor, when unnoticed, may cause a slip and fall, breaking one of the wrist bones.

While there are many injuries that can occur with the wrist, certain wrist fractures are more common than others. The following are a few of those that are experienced most frequently:

1. Colles’ Fracture

Colles’ fracture is also known as a distal radius fracture. It occurs when the radius, which is the longer forearm bone on the thumb side, breaks at the end toward the wrist. The radius is one of the most common broken bones in the United States. The fracture commonly occurs due to falling on an outstretched hand or a direct trauma to the wrist, but there are several other causes of this fracture, including: age, osteoporosis, lack of calcium or vitamin D.

2. Smith’s Fracture

Smith’s fracture is sometimes termed a reversed Colles’ fracture. It also involves the distal radius, but there are some crucial differences between these two. The Colles’ fracture results from falling onto an extended hand, causing the broken bone fragment to be displaced dorsally, or toward the back. The Smith’s fracture, however, involves falling onto a flexed hand, contributing to displacing the broken fragment of the bone ventrally, or toward the front.

3. Barton’s Fracture

Barton’s fracture also involves the radius. We distinguish two types of it: dorsal and volar. It occurs when the base of the thumb breaks and either the dorsal or volar fragment of the carpal gets dislocated. This condition is often called a fracture-dislocation of the radiocarpal joint.

4. Scaphoid Fracture

Apart from radius and ulna, the shorter bone of the forearm, there are also eight carpal bones that form the wrist, arranged in two rows. One of them is the scaphoid bone which sits at the base of the thumb right above the radius. This small, bean-shaped bone is prone to fractures, yet it’s often hard to detect them; they are sometimes mistaken with wrist sprains. Untreated scaphoid fracture may lead to non-unions, avascular necrosis, and early arthritis.

Throughout our lives, slipping, tripping, and falling at some point are inevitable. All of them may result in a couple of bruises, but some may require immediate medical attention to ensure proper treatment and healing. To make an appointment or learn more about wrist fractures, contact us.

Can Carpal Tunnel Syndrome be a Work-Related Injury?

Can Carpal Tunnel Syndrome be a Work-Related Injury?

According to OSHA, repetitive stress injuries (RSI) constitute one of the most costly occupational health problems affecting Americans. Carpal tunnel syndrome belongs to the group of common RSI, however, the question whether or not it is a work related injury is often dubious.

What is CTS? 

Carpal tunnel syndrome occurs when the median nerve in the wrist is compressed and inflamed. The symptoms include but are not limited to pain in the hand, tingling, numbness, and wrist weakness. There are multiple factors that may contribute to developing this condition, including age, arthritis, gender or anatomic factors. However, certain cases may be associated with particular activities, such as repetitive hand motion, strong gripping, typing, using vibrating tools or awkward hands positioning. All of these create a damaging pressure on the median nerve.

Is carpal tunnel syndrome a work related injury? 

Any worker who is required to use their fingers or wrist in a repetitive motion on a regular basis is at high risk of developing CTS. Painters, mechanics, assembly-line workers, cashiers and many other occupations are prone to suffer from this condition at some point. However, it is still an object of debate whether a particular case qualifies as a workplace injury since it has been proven that repetitive motion injuries are not the only cause leading to carpal tunnel syndrome. Factors like obesity, diabetes or prior wrist trauma may cause carpal tunnel syndrome as well. Sometimes, medical evidence along with review of the work environment are necessary in order to determine whether or not a specific case is actually work related. Overall, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that carpal tunnel syndrome has been the leading disability due to the amount of employees that must take time off from work.

Treatment 

There are many ways to treat carpal tunnel syndrome, varying from self-care like putting ice packs on the affected area, to wearing wrist braces and hand splints, attending physical therapy and taking anti-inflammatory medications like aspirin or ibuprofen. If the symptoms persist regardless of the treatment methods, surgery may be necessary. This will take pressure off the median nerve and bring relief to the symptoms.

If you feel you may be suffering from CTS, or to learn more about carpal tunnel syndrome, contact us today.

 

Sprains: A Common Injury in Young Athletes

Sprains: A Common Injury in Young Athletes

Out of all youth injuries that are related to playing sports, sprains and strains are by far the most common. The two injuries are similar in type – they are both either warped stretches or tears. The difference between them is that a strain is an injury to a muscle or tendon, while a sprain is the damage of a ligament.

Sprains are most often caused by trauma, such as an acute overstretch from a sudden twist or turn. These injuries are commonly seen in ankles, but any ligament can be affected. There is no way to prevent sprains with 100 percent certainty, however there are steps that can be taken to reduce the odds of one occurring.

Get into the habit of stretching properly after each workout session. Do not do so beforehand as the stretching of cold muscles can do more harm than good and can inhibit strength gains. Stretching not only improves the flexibility of the muscles, it also improves the flexibility of the connective tissue, including ligaments. You should also incorporate exercises into your routine that improve balance. Since impact or stretch trauma are the two primary causes of sprains, improving your balance will reduce your risk of falling or having to overcompensate in order to avoid doing so.

If a sprain is not treated correctly, or is left untreated, it can potentially lead to lasting problems. For example, an untreated wrist sprain can be a cause of carpal tunnel syndrome, which may require surgery to correct to prevent the condition from resulting in significant, lasting nerve damage. If your child has been affected by a sprain, it is imperative that you seek proper treatment. Determining the severity of the sprain is vital, as this will affect the treatment regimen.

Should you have any further questions on sprains, or if you suspect your child has a sprain, please give us a call.