Stay safe this baseball season

Stay healthy this baseball season by using these exercise tips

February marks the return of baseball with players reporting to their spring training camps. It’s also about time for the lower-level teams to begin practicing for the upcoming baseball season.

After a long winter, it can be an adjustment for players to get back in the routine of throwing a baseball, especially if your child has been participating in another sport or took a season off. This adjustment could spur injuries whether it be pulled muscles, ligament injuries or contusions.

As noted by OrthoInfo.AAOS.org, the U.S. Consumer Products Safety Commission reported more than 414,000 baseball-related injuries in the United States in 2010. That number only includes those who were treated in hospitals, doctors’ offices or emergency rooms. More than 282,000 of those injuries were to players 18 years old or younger.

The most common injuries in baseball are mild soft tissue injuries. These injuries are the muscle pulls, ligament injuries, cuts, and bruises. The repetitive nature of the sport can also cause injuries to the shoulder and elbow.

What should you do before you play?

For players, the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) recommends you have a pre-season physical exam. Doctors will be able to determine any potential medical problems, such as asthma, allergies, heart, or orthopaedic conditions.

It’s also important for players to warm up and stretch before any activity.

For coaches, knowing first aid is vital for recognizing and treating common injuries. Coaches should also know where they can find a telephone and a cardiac defibrillator in case of an emergency. Knowing the rules and encouraging safe play is also vital to keeping players injury-safe.

It’s also important to know the guidelines for youth baseball in terms of how many pitches can be thrown and which type of pitches, according to age. The USA Baseball Medical & Safety Advisory Committee recommends the following pitch count limits:

Age Max.
Pitches/Game
Max.
Pitches/Week
8 – 10 50 75
11 – 12 75 100
13 – 14 75 125
15 – 16 90 2 games / week
17 – 18 105 2 games / week

For more information on how to stay safe this baseball season, click here.

If you have suffered an injury playing baseball, please seek immediate care. If it isn’t an emergency, please visit Missouri Orthopedics & Advanced Sports Medicine for care and treatment.

Original article: http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=A00185