Retired? Stay Healthy at Home by Exercising

  • With Americans living longer on average than any time in history, people have questions about how to remain healthy during their retirement. Remaining healthy certainly includes physical activity; in fact, physical activity is essential. According to the Center on Disease Control, if you are 65 or older and are generally fit, and have no limiting health conditions, you should get two hours and thirty minutes of moderately intense aerobic activity each week–or 75 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity, and you should also train muscles twice per week.

Tufts Medical suggests several at-home exercises for retired people to develop stamina and strength. These can be done inside or outside the house!

Mature man working out at home

First two weeks

Walks: walk for five minutes to get warmed up and the blood flowing, outside if the weather suits or around the house. Treadmills are fine, too. The point is to get the heart pumping.

Squats: stand directly in front of a sturdy chair, with your arms stretched forward and parallel to the ground. With feet slightly wider than shoulder width, slowly lower your buttocks to the chair. Then stand again. Make sure you control the squat movement as you repeat 10 times.

Wall Push-ups: standing in front of a clear wall, place your palms on the wall–feet should be shoulder width. Then, bend the elbows as you lean toward the wall. Push back. Without ever locking your elbows, repeat ten times. Rest a minute. Do ten more.

Toe Stands: against something sturdy, such as a chair, counter, or wall, raise your self until you are standing only on the balls of your feet as you count to 4. Hold it at the top for 2-4 seconds. Repeat 10 times. Rest a minute. Repeat another 10 times.

Finger Marching: sitting or standing, imagine a wall in front of you while you walk your fingers up the wall, wiggling them at the top for ten seconds. Walk them back down. Repeat 10 times. Rest a minute. Repeat another 10 times. After, with arms and fingers stretched to the sky, try to touch your back with your hands. Continue the stretch if you can by reaching for the opposite elbow.

Increasing Strength During Weeks Three to Seven

For these additional exercises, you will need dumbbells and ankle weights, which are best purchased to add weight as you progress, beginning with 2 lbs for women and 3 lbs for men:

Bicep curl: sitting or standing, hold the dumbbells with arms down and palms facing thighs. Rotate forearms as you slowly lift the weights until palms are facing shoulders. Pause. Lower the weights to original position. Repeat 10 times. Rest a minute. Repeat another 10 times.

Step-ups: stand facing the base of some stairs with a handrail. Raise your left leg and place it on the stair. Then, place your weight on the left leg as you raise your right. Tap the right foot on the stair and then return. Repeat 10 times. Rest a minute. Repeat another 10 times for each leg.

Overhead Press: standing or sitting with feet should width, raise your hands with your palms and forearms facing forward, until the dumbbells are level with your shoulders and parallel to the floor. Slowly push the dumbbells up, fully extending, without locking the elbows. Pause. Slowly lower, as you count to four. Repeat 10 times. Rest a minute. Repeat another 10 times.

Side hip rise: standing behind a chair, with feet shoulder width, place your hands on the chair back. Slowly lift your left leg to the side, counting to 2 and keeping the leg straight. Remember, do not lock the knee. Then, slowly counting four, lower the leg. Repeat 10 times. Rest a minute. Repeat another 10 times for each leg.

After seven weeks, you should be in great shape, when you can add more strenuous exercises. Contact Missouri Orthopedics & Advanced Sports Medicine for any orthopedic concerns as you develop your fitness. Remember, keep motivated by setting goals, and they will help you maintain a consistent workout.