Osteoarthritis & Tylenol

Relieving Pain While Living With Osteoarthritis

Tylenol, also known as acetaminophen, is a pain relieving pill often taken for temporary moderate relief from osteoarthritis. However, note that Tylenol does not treat the inflammation that often times comes with this arthritis. It is important to consult with Dr. Irvine, or your general practitioner before taking Tylenol as some prescribed, and other over-the-counter medications contain acetaminophen. Consuming and digesting too much acetaminophen can be harmful to your overall health including your liver.

Osteoarthritis is one of the most common diagnoses of arthritis, and there is currently no cure; only ways to relieve temporary pain and discomfort. This becomes present when the cartilage found on your bones wear down; typically in aging bodies. This type of arthritis can cause pain & irritation in your knees, hips, hands and even your spine/back.

Woman grimacing in pain

Who is more likely to get osteoarthritis?

  • Older humans
  • Women
  • Being Overweight
  • Injuries over time, especially to the joints
  • Occupations that contain a lot of stress on a particular joint
  • Bone deformities
  • Diabetics, or other diseases like gout and rheumatoid arthritis

Do you think you have osteoarthritis?

common Symptoms to pay attention to:

  • Pain during, or after movement
  • Tenderness after applying light pressure to area
  • After inactivity, or waking up in the morning you may experience stiffness
  • Less flexible when trying to move in a normal range of motion
  • When using your joint, you may experience a grating noise or feeling
  • Little spurs around the bone

When to make an appointment with Dr. Irvine:

If you are experiencing any of the above symptoms for longer than two weeks and are growing concerned, then please give our St. Louis, MO office a call at 314-567-5850.

You may want to consider trying to answer the questions to come better prepared for your visit:

  1. When did your joint pain begin?
  2. How frequent is your pain?
  3. Do certain activities make your pain worse/better?
  4. Has this joint been injured before in the past?
  5. On a scale of 1-10, what level is your pain?