Take Concussions Seriously

Signs of concussion

Before hitting the football, baseball and soccer fields for practice in your upcoming fall season, make sure you are informed & educated on concussions.

What is a concussion? Long term damage to the brain due to an injury.

Concussions can happen to anyone who plays any sport, including sports such as basketball, wrestling, tennis & gymnastics. If you suspect someone has a concussion, the most important thing you can do is to remove them from the field of play and have them seek medical help. Hopefully your coach went though a training course on how to recognize when one of their player may be experiencing symptoms of a concussion.  Some concussion signs to look for include:

  • Confusion
  • Appearing dazed
  • Acting clumsy or moving rather slow
  • Memory loss. For example: the score of the game, or where they are
  • Unconsciousness

If you are a parent reading this article, we caution you against debating the authority the coach may make to remove your child from the game upon suspecting they are experiencing a concussion.  It is better to be safe, than sorry. And, returning to a game while experiencing a concussion can really cause some further brain trauma.

Just remember, that after seeking medical help for a concussion, it is important to continue to build your way back to recover and take things slow. And, that includes the doctors specific orders they may give about returning to the sport & playing field.

Upon receiving approval from a doctor to regain their physical activity, and they have been cleared to begin working out again, we suggest taking exercise slow. Concussions are a serious issue and it is important athletes take the time they need to recover from any head injury before returning to play.

For any questions regarding concussion or the safety of your health while playing on the field, give Dr. Irvine a call today.

Back to school

Backpack/Bookbag Safety

Bookbag safety, Backpack safety, Back pains

Children’s health and safety has been a continued concern for teachers, parents and health care specialists including Dr. Irvine. According to the Consumer Product Safety Commission, injuries from heavy backpacks result in more than 7,000 emergency room visits per year. Sprains and strains were among the top complaints in children.
Dr. Irvine suggests double checking the weight of your child’s backpack when it is full.
A rule of thumb, a backpack should weigh only 15% of a child’s total weight.  For example, if your child weights 100 pounds, their backpack when full should weight 15 pounds maximum, according to the American Occupational Therapy Association.  Also keep in mind when school supply shopping this year, that backpack straps should be wide and padded.  Make adjustments to the backpack so that the bottom of the full backpack is not more than four inches below your child’s waistline. If you are concerned about the weight of your child’s backpack, a rolling bookbag is a fantastic alternative option.

Stay safe this baseball season

Stay healthy this baseball season by using these exercise tips

February marks the return of baseball with players reporting to their spring training camps. It’s also about time for the lower-level teams to begin practicing for the upcoming baseball season.

After a long winter, it can be an adjustment for players to get back in the routine of throwing a baseball, especially if your child has been participating in another sport or took a season off. This adjustment could spur injuries whether it be pulled muscles, ligament injuries or contusions.

As noted by OrthoInfo.AAOS.org, the U.S. Consumer Products Safety Commission reported more than 414,000 baseball-related injuries in the United States in 2010. That number only includes those who were treated in hospitals, doctors’ offices or emergency rooms. More than 282,000 of those injuries were to players 18 years old or younger.

The most common injuries in baseball are mild soft tissue injuries. These injuries are the muscle pulls, ligament injuries, cuts, and bruises. The repetitive nature of the sport can also cause injuries to the shoulder and elbow.

What should you do before you play?

For players, the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) recommends you have a pre-season physical exam. Doctors will be able to determine any potential medical problems, such as asthma, allergies, heart, or orthopaedic conditions.

It’s also important for players to warm up and stretch before any activity.

For coaches, knowing first aid is vital for recognizing and treating common injuries. Coaches should also know where they can find a telephone and a cardiac defibrillator in case of an emergency. Knowing the rules and encouraging safe play is also vital to keeping players injury-safe.

It’s also important to know the guidelines for youth baseball in terms of how many pitches can be thrown and which type of pitches, according to age. The USA Baseball Medical & Safety Advisory Committee recommends the following pitch count limits:

Age Max.
8 – 10 50 75
11 – 12 75 100
13 – 14 75 125
15 – 16 90 2 games / week
17 – 18 105 2 games / week

For more information on how to stay safe this baseball season, click here.

If you have suffered an injury playing baseball, please seek immediate care. If it isn’t an emergency, please visit Missouri Orthopedics & Advanced Sports Medicine for care and treatment.

Original article: http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=A00185

Proper shoes, training can keep you injury-free this basketball season

Basketball injury prevention at Missouri Orthopedics & Advanced Sports Medicine

Although basketball isn’t as physical of a sport as football, it still carries a large risk of injuries throughout the season.

As noted by PhysioWorks.com.au, there are two forms of basketball injuries – acute/traumatic and overuse.

Acute or traumatic injuries occur due to a sudden force, or impact, such as a fall or a stumble. Overuse injuries occur over time due to stress on the muscles, joints and soft tissues without proper time to heal.

According to a study of high school basketball players by the National Athletic Trainers’ Association (NATA):

  • 22% of all male basketball players sustained at least one time-loss injury each year.
  • 42% of the injuries were to the ankle/foot
  • 11% hip and thigh
  • 9% knee
  • Sprains were the most common type of injury (43%).
  • General trauma was the second most common type of injury (22%).
  • 60% percent of the injuries occurred during practice highlighting the need to warm up and strap for training.
  • 59% of game-related injuries occurred during the second half of the game, which identifies fatigue as a predisposing factor.

How can you prevent getting injured during the basketball season?

Physio Works suggests warming up thoroughly prior to playing a game or training, ensure you have excellent core control, speed, strength and agility, wear supportive basketball shoes with skid-resistant soles, use good technique, and check the court for slippery spots or debris before playing.

Click here to learn more about the most common basketball injuries.

At Missouri Orthopedics & Advanced Sports Medicine, we specialize in treating a variety of orthopedic injuries and chronic conditions for patients of all ages. We also evaluate and treat work related injuries.

Give us a call today (314) 567-5850 to let us get you back to full health.

The Bright Side of an Injury

The Positive Side To Injuries


An injury can be a huge setback for any athlete or fitness enthusiast, but is it the end of the world? Absolutely not! At Missouri Orthopedics, we understand that you want to get back to your normal routine as soon as possible, but we also want you to know that there may be benefits to your injury.

Bari Lieberman from Refinery29 wrote an article entitled “Why I’m Glad I Broke My Ankle.” During her story, she explains how she ended up breaking her ankle during a laser tag game. She was devastated that she would not be able to perform her workouts that she claims she was “addicted” to. She used exercise to relieve stress and to take a break from the demands of being a senior in college.

While her ankle was injured she could no longer perform her usual workout routine, the same workout routine that she had been doing since she was in high school. Although she was mobile, she could not get on an elliptical or a treadmill and that was her go to start of exercise. Instead of completely throwing in the towel on fitness while her injury healed, Lieberman decided to compromise and try something new. She began using a rower. During this new workout she discovered that she was being challenged much more during this than she had been for some time on her cardio machines. Even after her injury was healed she kept exploring different types of exercises that would challenge her. She says being injured opened up her eyes and now she is getting more from her workouts.

Your doctor or your PT should talk with you about what you can and cannot do while recovering from your injury, but Bari Lieberman’s story is one to keep in mind. Take your injury & go with it, see the positives that it can bring and embrace them!