Knee Arthroscopy: Your First Step to Minimize Your Time on the Sidelines!

Your knee hurts. Maybe it’s been building slowly to this point, or maybe you know exactly when it happened. Maybe it’s a dull ache; maybe it’s a sharp pain that makes everyday activities unbearable. In any case, when you are tired of the pain impacting your performance, it is time to consult a professional like Dr. Irvine.

One of the most common methods of diagnosing knee pain is knee arthroscopy. With this procedure, several small incisions are made on and around your knee and a small high-resolution camera is used to view the joint. Arthroscopy can also help your doctor repair your knee, as the other incisions are used to insert small instruments to remove or repair damaged tissue.

The procedure can be performed under either local, regional or general anesthesia, and is commonly performed in a matter of hours as an outpatient procedure, so no overnight hospital stays are usually required.

While recovery time depends on a number of factors, typical recovery time from arthroscopic knee surgery is 4-6 weeks, which is generally much faster than the time required to recover from open knee surgery. Of course, your results will largely depend on your willingness and ability to be an active participant by following your doctor’s instructions for post-surgery care and adhering to your prescribed physical therapy regimen.

No procedure is guaranteed to alleviate knee pain, and it is important for your doctor to evaluate your symptoms and medical history before determining whether you are a candidate for knee arthroscopy.

For more information about knee arthroscopy, or to schedule an appointment, contact us to take the first step to getting off the sidelines and back into the game.

Do you need Total Joint Replacement?

Joint injuries are common in the athletic field, regardless of the sport.

However, a joint injury doesn’t mean that you have to stop playing. It is possible to repair through total joint replacement surgery.

Total Joint Replacement, Missouri Orthopedics, Dr. Irvine, Elbow Joints

The most common joints replaced are the knee, hip, and elbow joints, though the shoulder, wrist, and ankle can handle the surgical procedure. It is one of the last resorts that many doctors will use, however if it is used, it is due to medical necessity.

Dr. Irvine will typically recommend total joint replacement in the event that other alternative treatments are not working to heal your injury. A medication is typically prescribed in hopes of easing the pain and symptoms, place you in physical therapy, and alter your daily activities to ease the pain. While these have worked in many instances, it is not always the best route to take.

According to research in 2010, not only is it possible to have total joint replacement surgery safely, but you can continue to play your sport freely. In fact, the researchers were shocked to announce that the participants that engaged in “non-recommended sports actually showed higher knee and function scores” than the ones who didn’t.

Should you get total joint replacement? There are a few signs that you should discuss this with a doctor.

  • recurring or persistent joint pain
  • immobility
  • stiff or swollen joints
  • grating joints
  • previous injury to the joint in question
  • difficulty climbing in/up and out/down

You can discuss this, and other alternatives, with MO Sports Med. Contact us today!

Common Hockey Injuries

Concussions, Back Injuries, Elbow Injuries

Hockey Players Take A Beating, Typically

It is no surprise that hockey player undergo some physical pushing and shoving during the game. Sometimes the game is so physical that it can lead to injuries to their body which requires the medical attention of a doctor. We recommend an advanced sports medicine doctor like our very own, Dr. Irvine.

Ice hockey players fighting during game, Dr. Irvine, Sport Medicine

What are some common hockey player injuries?

Concussion This is a traumatic brain injury which may alter the way your brain functions.

Shoulder Injury* Our team evaluates and treat shoulder injuries including labral tears, Bankart lesions, rotator cuff tears & more.

Elbow Injury* Dr Irvine helps east the pain from elbow injuries such as fractures.

Back Injury Hockey players are especially at risk for lower back injuries which can affect your skating stride and overall comfort.

Hip Injury* Dr Irvine is experienced in treating hip arthroscopy as well as performing total hip replacement.

Knee Injury* Our doctor can perform ACL and PCL reconstruction, whether it be minimally invasive or a total reconstruction. However, his experience does not stop there. He is also able to treat a number of other knee conditions and injuries.

Wrist Injury* If you are experiencing a mallet finger injury and/or a wrist or hand fracture, then Dr. Irvine is your guy to call.

* Denotes services in which Dr. Irvine can help diagnose & treat.

If you are interested in jumping onto the road of recovery, and would like to become a potential patient of ours, please call today to schedule your appointment 314-567-5850.

Osteoarthritis & Tylenol

Relieving Pain While Living With Osteoarthritis

Tylenol, also known as acetaminophen, is a pain relieving pill often taken for temporary moderate relief from osteoarthritis. However, note that Tylenol does not treat the inflammation that often times comes with this arthritis. It is important to consult with Dr. Irvine, or your general practitioner before taking Tylenol as some prescribed, and other over-the-counter medications contain acetaminophen. Consuming and digesting too much acetaminophen can be harmful to your overall health including your liver.

Osteoarthritis is one of the most common diagnoses of arthritis, and there is currently no cure; only ways to relieve temporary pain and discomfort. This becomes present when the cartilage found on your bones wear down; typically in aging bodies. This type of arthritis can cause pain & irritation in your knees, hips, hands and even your spine/back.

Woman grimacing in pain

Who is more likely to get osteoarthritis?

  • Older humans
  • Women
  • Being Overweight
  • Injuries over time, especially to the joints
  • Occupations that contain a lot of stress on a particular joint
  • Bone deformities
  • Diabetics, or other diseases like gout and rheumatoid arthritis

Do you think you have osteoarthritis?

common Symptoms to pay attention to:

  • Pain during, or after movement
  • Tenderness after applying light pressure to area
  • After inactivity, or waking up in the morning you may experience stiffness
  • Less flexible when trying to move in a normal range of motion
  • When using your joint, you may experience a grating noise or feeling
  • Little spurs around the bone

When to make an appointment with Dr. Irvine:

If you are experiencing any of the above symptoms for longer than two weeks and are growing concerned, then please give our St. Louis, MO office a call at 314-567-5850.

You may want to consider trying to answer the questions to come better prepared for your visit:

  1. When did your joint pain begin?
  2. How frequent is your pain?
  3. Do certain activities make your pain worse/better?
  4. Has this joint been injured before in the past?
  5. On a scale of 1-10, what level is your pain?

 

Take Concussions Seriously

Signs of concussion

Before hitting the football, baseball and soccer fields for practice in your upcoming fall season, make sure you are informed & educated on concussions.

What is a concussion? Long term damage to the brain due to an injury.

Concussions can happen to anyone who plays any sport, including sports such as basketball, wrestling, tennis & gymnastics. If you suspect someone has a concussion, the most important thing you can do is to remove them from the field of play and have them seek medical help. Hopefully your coach went though a training course on how to recognize when one of their player may be experiencing symptoms of a concussion.  Some concussion signs to look for include:

  • Confusion
  • Appearing dazed
  • Acting clumsy or moving rather slow
  • Memory loss. For example: the score of the game, or where they are
  • Unconsciousness

If you are a parent reading this article, we caution you against debating the authority the coach may make to remove your child from the game upon suspecting they are experiencing a concussion.  It is better to be safe, than sorry. And, returning to a game while experiencing a concussion can really cause some further brain trauma.

Just remember, that after seeking medical help for a concussion, it is important to continue to build your way back to recover and take things slow. And, that includes the doctors specific orders they may give about returning to the sport & playing field.

Upon receiving approval from a doctor to regain their physical activity, and they have been cleared to begin working out again, we suggest taking exercise slow. Concussions are a serious issue and it is important athletes take the time they need to recover from any head injury before returning to play.

For any questions regarding concussion or the safety of your health while playing on the field, give Dr. Irvine a call today.