How To Maximize Your Health & Performance

Recovery & Rehabilitation

Recovery and rehabilitation means something different to almost every patient. And medical professionals have a variety of different ways to evaluate both recovery and rehabilitation.

Rehabilitation: Not Just for Athletes

Returning to “peak performance” can mean returning to a full work week (without the need to rely on pain medications) or it can mean returning to independent living. Or, certainly, it can mean returning to the sports field (or track, or court) to be as competitive as ever.

Dr. David Irvine and the entire staff here at Missouri Orthopedics specialize is treating a wide variety of patients, with a wide variety of injuries and chronic conditions. We strive to understand each individual patient’s condition, extent of the injury, and set realistic – but optimistic – goals for recovery.

Activity Can Continue After Treatment, During Recovery and Rehabilitation

We have seen many patients who have put off orthopedic exams and treatments because they thought that once treatment (or surgery) was needed, it signaled the end of particular activities. But that’s simply not the case.

Advances in understanding human physiology, as well as advances in orthopedic treatment, mean that today’s procedures provide a means to a more active lifestyle – not the end of activity.

Anytime you have joint pain or limited movement, it affects your overall health. Our goal it to increase your joint strength and mobility, so you can return to your sport (or work, or previous level of activity, in any aspect of life) with better overall function and a reduced chance of further injury.

That’s the real goal of recovery and rehabilitation – can’t we all agree?

Don’t wait to take care of yourself. Contact us for an evaluation so we can help you get back to working, playing, and living life the way you want to.

St. Louis Blue Playoffs Run

St. Louis hockey fans have reason to be excited as the St. Louis Blues continue an exciting playoff run. The Blues have made it to the second round of the NHL playoffs, now battling against the Dallas Stars after knocking off the 2015 Stanley Cup champions, the Chicago Blackhawks. The Blues are seeking their first ever Stanley Cup Championship.

The Blues won a thrilling 7-game series against the Blackhawks, winning game 7 of the series 3-2. The Blues were led by Vladimir Tarasenko with four goals in the series, and some outstanding play from goalkeeper Brian Elliot, who made 236 saves on 254 shots during the series.

The round two series against Dallas is proving to be an exciting one, with two games that have gone into overtime, and some big wins for the Blues on two occasions: 4-1 and 6-1.

The Blues have avoided injuries thus far in the playoffs, and will welcome back forward Steve Ott to the lineup for game six against the Stars. Ott ripped his hamstring after an awkward collision against the boards during a game back in December. The Blues were extremely supportive of Ott as he recovered, paying him visits and sending gifts. Just as Ott was ready to begin playing again in April, he was diagnosed with Colitis, an inflammation of the inner colon, and was unable to play for another two weeks. But now Ott is ready to go for this series against the Stars.

Join us in cheering on the Blues this playoff season! If you have suffered from a hockey injury or any other sports injury, contact us at Missouri Orthopedics & Advanced Sports Medicine and let us help you get back in the game.

Understanding Elbow Arthroscopy

The elbow joint consists of three bones: the humerus bone of the upper arm, and the ulna and radius bones of the forearm. The ulna and the humerus meet at the elbow and form a hinge, allowing the arm to straighten and bend. Life without this ability would be difficult, indeed.

Thanks to elbow arthroscopy, conditions inhibiting the normal use of the elbow can be treated, relieving pain and enabling one to freely use their elbow again.

What is elbow arthroscopy?

Missouri Orthopedic Care St. Louis, Advanced Sports Medicine

Arthroscopy is a procedure that allows surgeons to inspect, diagnose, and repair problems such as releasing scar tissue to improve range of motion, removing loose cartilage and bone fragments, repair lesions, among others.

Common procedures include:

  • Removing loose fragments in the joint
  • Repairing fractures
  • Treatment of tennis elbow (lateral epicondylitis)
  • Treatment of osteoarthritis (arthritis that causes wear and tear)
  • Treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (inflammatory arthritis)
  • Treatment of elbow stiffness often caused by fractures and other injuries

How is elbow arthroscopy performed?

Under general or regional anesthesia, a fiber-optic camera is inserted through a cut the width of a pencil in the elbow, magnifying and projecting the structures of the elbow on a television screen. This allows the surgeon to diagnose the condition. Several other small cuts allow insertion of additional instruments into the joint for treatment.

Recovery and rehabilitation.

Arthroscopy is usually an outpatient procedure; expect to return home with a bandage over your incisions, your arm possibly placed in a splint to keep it still and instructions to put ice on it and elevate it regularly for the next couple of days. You more than likely will be given instructions for certain exercises to perform to build strength and increase movement and may even need physical therapy to complete the rehabilitation process. While recovery from elbow arthroscopy is often faster than that of open surgery, expect it to take several weeks for your joint to completely recover.

For more information on elbow arthroscopy and how we can help, contact Missouri Orthopedics & Advanced Sports Medicine.

Knee Arthroscopy: Your First Step to Minimize Your Time on the Sidelines!

Your knee hurts. Maybe it’s been building slowly to this point, or maybe you know exactly when it happened. Maybe it’s a dull ache; maybe it’s a sharp pain that makes everyday activities unbearable. In any case, when you are tired of the pain impacting your performance, it is time to consult a professional like Dr. Irvine.

One of the most common methods of diagnosing knee pain is knee arthroscopy. With this procedure, several small incisions are made on and around your knee and a small high-resolution camera is used to view the joint. Arthroscopy can also help your doctor repair your knee, as the other incisions are used to insert small instruments to remove or repair damaged tissue.

The procedure can be performed under either local, regional or general anesthesia, and is commonly performed in a matter of hours as an outpatient procedure, so no overnight hospital stays are usually required.

While recovery time depends on a number of factors, typical recovery time from arthroscopic knee surgery is 4-6 weeks, which is generally much faster than the time required to recover from open knee surgery. Of course, your results will largely depend on your willingness and ability to be an active participant by following your doctor’s instructions for post-surgery care and adhering to your prescribed physical therapy regimen.

No procedure is guaranteed to alleviate knee pain, and it is important for your doctor to evaluate your symptoms and medical history before determining whether you are a candidate for knee arthroscopy.

For more information about knee arthroscopy, or to schedule an appointment, contact us to take the first step to getting off the sidelines and back into the game.

Do you need Total Joint Replacement?

Joint injuries are common in the athletic field, regardless of the sport.

However, a joint injury doesn’t mean that you have to stop playing. It is possible to repair through total joint replacement surgery.

Total Joint Replacement, Missouri Orthopedics, Dr. Irvine, Elbow Joints

The most common joints replaced are the knee, hip, and elbow joints, though the shoulder, wrist, and ankle can handle the surgical procedure. It is one of the last resorts that many doctors will use, however if it is used, it is due to medical necessity.

Dr. Irvine will typically recommend total joint replacement in the event that other alternative treatments are not working to heal your injury. A medication is typically prescribed in hopes of easing the pain and symptoms, place you in physical therapy, and alter your daily activities to ease the pain. While these have worked in many instances, it is not always the best route to take.

According to research in 2010, not only is it possible to have total joint replacement surgery safely, but you can continue to play your sport freely. In fact, the researchers were shocked to announce that the participants that engaged in “non-recommended sports actually showed higher knee and function scores” than the ones who didn’t.

Should you get total joint replacement? There are a few signs that you should discuss this with a doctor.

  • recurring or persistent joint pain
  • immobility
  • stiff or swollen joints
  • grating joints
  • previous injury to the joint in question
  • difficulty climbing in/up and out/down

You can discuss this, and other alternatives, with MO Sports Med. Contact us today!