Arthroscopy – Not Just to Get a Better Look!

Arthroscopy – Not Just to Get a Better Look!

Most have probably heard the term arthroscopy, even if we aren’t exactly sure what it means. Arthroscopy, like much of medical terminology, comes from the Greek language; Arthro- means joint and -scopy is the act of viewing with a camera or lens.

During arthroscopy, one or more small incisions are made around the joint and a camera is inserted, as well as a variety of tiny surgical instruments. This allows Dr. Irvine to not only diagnose problems by looking around inside the joint with a camera, but he can also treat problems, using burrs, drills, rasps and other surgical instruments to remove and reshape bone, release caught tendons and clean out broken pieces of cartilage.

Why arthroscopy instead of open surgical procedures? Since arthroscopic procedures utilize much smaller surgical incisions, there is much less soft tissue to heal, meaning less pain and a quicker recovery time.

What joints can be treated arthroscopically? While most joints can be viewed arthroscopically, some of the most common candidates for arthroscopic examination and treatment include the knees, hips, shoulders and wrists. Many spinal procedures are now performed arthroscopically, as well as temporomandibular joint (TMJ) conditions.

What conditions can be treated arthroscopically? Here at Missouri Orthopedics and Advanced Sports Medicine, we are using state-of-the-art arthroscopic treatment for many conditions. Evaluation and some treatments can be done arthroscopically for shoulder disease, hip conditions, knee pain and injuries and more.

Procedures like total knee replacements and other more involved surgeries requiring large hardware or prostheses cannot be performed arthroscopically.

To find out more about arthroscopy and all of the orthopedic services we have to offer, please contact us. There’s no need to put up with the pain and limitations any longer!

General Orthopedic Care – Caring for Broken Bones

General Orthopedic Care – Caring for Broken Bones

There are many ways a bone can be injured or broken. Car accidents, contact sports, falls, and workplace accidents are some of the most common ways bones sustain injuries. Regardless of the cause, broken bones should be treated as soon as possible to avoid complications. The best way to treat an injury to a bone is to ensure proper alignment and stabilization.

Leaving a bone break or injury untreated can result in complications including bone deformity and permanent nerve damage. An untreated break may also cause damage to surrounding muscle and ligaments. These complications occur because bone is living tissue that attempts to heal itself in stages:

  • The trauma of the break damages blood vessels within the bone resulting in bleeding inside the tissue. Within hours this blood forms a clot. The blood clot associated with a broken bone contains specialized cells known as fibroblasts.
  • In a few days, these cells begin to manufacture granulation tissue. This tissue begins to form a web of cartilage and fibrocartilage and is known as the soft callus stage. This stage may last from about four days to as long as three weeks in most cases.
  • At this point cells known as osteoblasts begin to make new bone tissue. Usually, this process begins at about two to three weeks and ends at about six to eight weeks. This is known as the hard callus stage and depending on the location and severity of the break, may continue for months.
  • The final process is remodeling. Specialized cells called osteoclasts begin to break down excess bone in the fractured area, reducing the size of the callus and replacing it with hard, compact bone tissue. As this happens, the bone returns to its original size and shape. During this time, the bone functions as well as before the break; however, the process of complete remodeling can take years to complete.

Because bone begins to heal itself almost immediately after an injury, it is vital to see a doctor as soon as possible in order to assure correct healing and avoid complications.

When you visit our office for a broken bone, an X-ray of the affected area would be done to determine the type and severity of the break. For the majority of simple fractures, the bone is able to be gently manipulated back into place. If a more complex or severe break is found, the bone may require stabilization with pins, screws, or plates. Once the bone is back to the correct alignment, immobilization with a cast, splint, or in some cases, traction is essential in order to minimize pain and allow the bone to continue to repair itself in the correct position.

Once the bone is stabilized, recovery and rehabilitation can begin. Dr. Irvine and his team will devise a plan to suit your specific needs. A proper rehabilitation program promotes blood flow to assist in healing and maintaining muscle tone, while also reducing stiffness and helping prevent blood clots.

No matter what the cause, Missouri Orthopedics & Advanced Sports Medicine is here to help. Our clinic can diagnose and treat all types of breaks to get you back to your day-to-day activities. Contact us if you suspect you may have a broken bone or other orthopedic injury. We provide prompt, professional care to minimize further damage and get you back to a healthy, active lifestyle.

Elbow Arthroscopy Recovery: How to Help Yourself Recover Stronger

A large majority of people who need to undergo surgery are curious about the recovery times, the level of pain they may experience, and what they will need to do to recover afterwards. The good news is, there are many things patients can do to recover stronger after a surgery such as Elbow Arthroscopy.

Elbow Arthroscopy can be performed to diagnose and fix many problems, such as releasing scar tissue or resurfacing the bone. It is often a very successful surgery, providing patients with less ongoing pain and a better range of motion. Immediately after the surgery, patients will notice the improved range of motion available in their elbow as there are very few limitations placed upon movement at this point. A sling is often given for comfort only.

As this is a surgical procedure, some pain and discomfort is to be expected, but the method of using only a small incision means this will generally only last the first week of recovery. If the surgery was more extensive, it will likely be several more weeks before the pain subsides. In either case, patients may be prescribed pain medication to help with any discomfort. Icing and raising the elbow for the first 48 hours after surgery as directed by the doctor will also help with the pain and recovery.

The doctor may ask the patient to leave on the post-surgery dressing for several days and to keep the area dry. After its removal, bathing can continue as normal, but always ensure that the wounds are covered with antibiotic ointment and bandages after bathing as directed by the doctor. Sutures are removed after one week.

Once the initial recovery time is complete, physical therapy will begin and lasts for approximately 4-6 weeks or until maximum range of motion is accomplished, allowing the patient to return to normal activities such as playing sports and moving regularly again!

To learn more about this simple recovery process or to schedule your Elbow Arthroscopy procedure, contact us.

Ouch! What’s going on with my elbow?

You are used to doing everything you want to do. Lately, though, just picking up a gallon of milk with your right hand hurts so much it almost makes you cry. You made an appointment with your primary care provider, who thinks you are developing osteoarthritis in that elbow. She referred you to us, the Missouri Orthopedics & Advanced Sports Medicine Center.

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After hearing your story, reading your history and reviewing some plain x-rays your PCP had obtained, one of the tools our board-certified surgeons may use to both diagnose and treat your elbow pain and dysfunction is elbow arthroscopy.

What is Elbow Arthroscopy?

The elbow, like all the joints of the human body, is a truly amazing anatomical structure. Through small spaces between the bones pass all of the nerves and blood supply for your hand. In addition to the pain symptoms you are currently experiencing, problems in the elbow can cause pain, numbness and weakness to everything past the elbow – your forearm and hand. Compromised blood flow from the elbow to the hand can cause even more serious symptoms.

Arthroscopy is ideally suited to examine the elbow. Instead of a large, open surgical procedure, one or more tiny incisions are made in the elbow to pass a small fiber-optic camera and various small instruments into the elbow space to both diagnose and potentially treat your pain.

While the x-rays your PCP ordered rule out obvious fractures, elbow arthroscopy can also treat arthritis, loose bodies in the elbow, stiffness, tennis elbow and many other conditions of the elbow.

Because arthroscopy does not use large incisions, less soft tissue has to heal, leading to less post-operative pain and speedier recovery times.

To set up an appointment, please contact us. There’s no need to put up with the pain and limitations! We look forward to hearing from you soon.

Total Joint Replacement

Having Total Joint Replacement

Total joint replacement is not a step that is ever taken lightly, but should you need this advanced surgical option, Missouri Orthopedics and Advanced Sports Medicine is committed to making this a winning experience from evaluation to recovery: Missouri Sports Medicine. Before deciding your joint’s condition warrants replacement, several less drastic forms of care may be tried. These can include physical therapy, injections, and arthroscopic surgery. If these ameliorative treatments don’t restore the joint’s normal function, an x-ray, and possibly an MRI, may be ordered to determine any joint and tissue damage.

The Decision for Surgery

Assuming that you are healthy enough for surgery, joint instability, pain that won’t allow you to sleep at night, the inability to perform the normal daily functions of life, and being prevented from doing the things you enjoy are all factors that may lead you to decide that total joint replacement is the best option. After you and your doctor decide that you will go ahead with the surgery, you will be thoroughly briefed on what to expect, and you will also be informed about the preparation that should take place in the home, so your recovery phase will run smoothly. In most cases you will be administered general anesthesia before the procedure begins. Using knee-joint replacement as an example, damaged parts of the joint will be removed in preparation for your new knee, and after the surfaces of the joint have been prepared, the new components of the knee will be anchored in place.

Post-Total Joint Surgery

After coming out of surgery, a great number of post-surgical tasks will be taking place. You will, of course, be having pain medication administered, but steps will also be undertaken to monitor the surgery site for infection. You may also receive blood thinners to prevent blood clots from forming, and as soon as possible, steps will be taken to maximize the joint’s flexibility. Your hospital stay may last from 3-5 days, and, in addition to post-operative care, light physical therapy will begin.

Recovery From Total Joint Surgery

By far, the greatest part of your recovery will take place during the 4 to 6 weeks following surgery. The physical therapy and follow-up doctor visits you keep will have you well on the way to a much-improved quality of life. If you need a consultation about possibly needing this procedure, please contact us.